Did you know...

  • There are more than 130 species of trees in Canada.
  • Everyone has at least one piece of clothing that comes from wood! When made into pulp, wood can be used in manufacturing rayon or other fibers for the textile industry.
  • All trees are either hardwood or softwood. Hardwood species lose their leaves and their wood is hard. Softwood species produce cones and their wood is softer. Softwoods are also referred to as resinous trees because of their thick sap (resin) that keeps them green all year long.
  • Bowling pins, hockey sticks, baseball bats, tennis rackets, racketball rackets, and lacrosse sticks all contain wood.
  • Canada's original pioneers stuffed their mattresses with dry beech leaves. They thought that beech leaves were more comfortable than straw!
  • Can you guess what explosives, scrapbooks, photographic film, wigs, and cellophane have in common? Wood, of course! All of these chemical-based products come from cellulose, which is itself extracted from woodpulp.
  • Picea, a species related to the fir, contains a substance used in making candy, chewing gum, and medications.
  • Some trees grow so slowly that it takes them 200 years to get big enough to harvest.
  • Wood from the black willow is one of the raw materials used in making polo balls.
  • Some species of wood resonate better than any other material. That's why they are used in making musical instruments.
  • The wheels of old-time cars were made...of wood!